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Shorter Daylight, More Active Deer Drive Need for Extra Caution on Roads

As the end of Daylight Savings Time will soon bring an earlier nightfall, PennDOT is cautioning motorists that most crashes involving deer happen at this time of year.

Deer are most active during their breeding season, and particularly between sunset and sunrise. Harvesting and hunting activity can also increase the movement of deer.

According to a PennDOT press release, as the end of Daylight Savings Time will soon bring an earlier nightfall, PennDOT is cautioning motorists that most crashes involving deer happen at this time of year.

Deer are most active during their breeding season, and particularly between sunset and sunrise. Harvesting and hunting activity can also increase the movement of deer.

PennDOT statistics show nearly half of all reportable crashes in the past five years involving deer occurred in the months of October and November, with nearly 77 percent taking place between 5 p.m. and 7 a.m. Last year, there were more than 3,000 crashes statewide involving deer, resulting in more than 600 injuries and eight fatalities.

To reduce the risk of a deer-related crash, motorists should slow down and be especially cautious during morning and evening hours. Motorists should also increase following distance between vehicles, especially where deer-crossing signs are posted. Deer often travel in herds, so if you see one deer crossing the road, there’s a strong chance that others will follow.

To report a dead deer on state roads, motorists can call 1-800-FIX-ROAD.

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